Browsing Tag: stress

Stress and Heart Problems Linked


Stress kills… next

Stress and Heart Problems Linked

Study Shows How Stress And Heart Problems May Be Linked

Kate Kelland reporting for Reuters stated that research published in The Lancet suggests individuals “with heightened activity in the amygdala, an area of the brain linked to stress, may be at greater risk of heart disease and stroke.”

Jacqueline Howard writing for CNN reported that the study included nearly 300 “adults who underwent PET and CT scans…between 2005 and 2008.” These “scans recorded brain activity, bone marrow activity, spleen activity and inflammation in the heart arteries.” The investigators then “tracked the health of each patient for two to five years, during which 22 of the patients had a cardiovascular disease event.”

Comment: Stress reduction is essential to preventing cardiac events.

Stress Leads To Better Bird Parenting

[stream provider=video flv=https://s3.amazonaws.com/Blog-3-2012/stress+leads+to+better+bird+parenting.flv mp4=https://s3.amazonaws.com/Blog-3-2012/stress+leads+to+better+bird+parenting.mp4 embed=false share=true width=320 height=240 dock=true controlbar=over bandwidth=high autostart=false /]

Stress May Lead to Better Bird Parenting

 

According to Science Daily, birds with high levels of stress hormones have the highest mating success and offer better parental care to their brood, according to new biology research at Queen’s University.  “Having high levels of glucocorticoid or stress hormone is often thought to indicate an individual in poor condition who has a low level of mating success. However, our research indicates that tree swallows with the highest levels of stress hormone have the highest reproductive success,” says Frances Bonier who investigates the way animals cope with challenges in their environment.  The researchers measured glucocorticoid levels in female tree swallows before and after experimentally changing their brood sizes. Females whose broods were enlarged by two nestlings nearly doubled their glucocorticoid levels, while the glucocorticoid levels of females whose broods were reduced remained unchanged.  Females with greater increases in glucocorticoids also fed their nestlings at higher rates, suggesting that stress hormones facilitate parental behavior.  What’s this have to do with arthritis?  Absolutely nothing but I thought it was cool.

Search the Vlog