Browsing Tag: osteoarthritis

Pain Predictor of Knee Osteoarthritis


Are there early warning signs of knee arthritis? Yup!

Persistent knee pain predicts structural arthritis early.

Sara Freeman writing in Rheumatology news reported on a study that showed that persistent knee pain is in important predictor of structural joint damage and could potentially be used to predict knee osteoarthritis earlier according to Dutch research reported at the World Congress on Osteoarthritis. The analysis found that women participating in the Rotterdam study who had knee pain on most days of the preceding month were more than 4 times more likely to develop knee osteoarthritis within 5 years on MRI than were those without frequent knee pain.

Comment: a key finding.

Fat Stem Cells for Knee Arthritis


More good news on the stem cell front… next

New Treatment Shows Promise for Crippling Knee Arthritis

Alan Mozes writing for Healthday reported on a small study that demonstrated that just one injection of stem cells can reduce pain and inflammation.

The idea is experimental: Extract stem cells from a patient’s own body fat — cells known for their ability to differentiate and perform any number of regenerative functions — and inject them directly into the damaged knee joint.

To explore the potential of stem cell therapy, the study authors focused on 18 French and German men and women, aged 50 to 75, all of whom had struggled with severe knee osteoarthritis for at least a year before joining the study.

Between April 2012 and December 2013, all of the patients first underwent liposuction to extract fat-derived samples of a specific type of stem cell. The researchers noted that these particular stem cells have been shown to have immune-boosting and anti-scarring properties, as well as the ability to protect against cell “stress” and death.

A third of the patients received a single “low-dose” injection of their own stem cells directly into their knee. Another third received a “medium-dose” injection, involving a little more than four times the amount of stem cells, while the remaining group received a “high-dose” injection packed with roughly five times as many stem cells as the medium-dose group.

After six months, the study team found that all three groups showed improvements in terms of pain, function and mobility.

However, only those in the low-dose group were determined to have “statistically significant” improvements in terms of both knee pain and function recovery.

Comment: this data is in keeping with other studies.

FDA Nixes Antacids With Aspirin


An over the counter preparation that could be life-threatening… next

FDA warns OTC antacids with aspirin can cause stomach or intestinal bleeding

Lydia Wheeler writing in The Hill reported that the Food and Drug Administration “is warning consumers to beware of over-the-counter drugs that contain both an antacid and aspirin.” According to the agency, these products “can cause stomach or intestinal bleeding.” Although rare, the FDA says it has identified eight cases of serious bleeding since 2009.

Comment: Not a big surprise here. In the old days when we used high doses of aspirin, people would get bleeding ulcers frequently.

 

Barefoot Running Fewer Musculoskeletal Injuries


Are you a runner… the next item is for you…

Running Barefoot May Protect Against Some Musculoskeletal Injuries

Dr. Lara Pullen writing in enews rheum reported on a study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. “We aren’t seeing more musculoskeletal injuries in barefoot runners,” explains Dr. Altman-Singles, one of the authors, in an interview. “If anything, we are seeing fewer of certain types of musculoskeletal injuries.”

The researchers examined the differences in injuries between habitually barefoot and habitually shod runners. They categorized participants as barefoot runners if individuals spent at least 50% of their running time barefoot. Barefoot runners were allowed to run in minimalist footwear for the balance of their running time. In many cases, barefoot runners had experienced injuries, such as fasciitis and iliotibial band syndrome, prior to switching to barefoot running.

The researchers also noted that plantar fasciitis was more common in the shod group than the barefoot group. Additionally, shod runners experienced more patellofemoral pain syndrome and ITBS than did barefoot runners. Dr. Altman-Singles describes this difference as huge. Although barefoot running may have offered some protection against plantar fasciitis, barefoot runners had a greater number of Achilles or calf and posterior tibialis strains when compared with shod runners.

Comment: If you want to try this, be careful.

T’ai chi as effective as PT for Knee OA


Now that we know acetaminophen doesn’t work for osteoarthritis, is there something else that might. There is and the answer will surprise you… next

Tai Chi May Be as Good as PT for Knee Arthritis Pain

Janis Kelly writing for Medscape reported the first randomized head-to-head comparison of tai chi and conventional physical therapy (PT) in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) shows equally good pain relief with either intervention, researchers report in an article published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The researchers also show that tai chi was more effective than PT at relieving depression and improving the physical component of quality of life.

Comment: No side effects either. Nice.

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