Browsing Tag: osteoarthritis

Reduced Risk of Death in Weekend Warriors


Hey… are you a weekend warrior?   Here’s some good news for you…

Do Exercise ‘Weekend Warriors’ Lower Their Risk Of Death?

Dr. Jack cush writing in RheumNow reported a new article published in JAMA Internal Medicine suggests that compared with inactive adults, weekend warriors who performed the recommended amount of 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of vigorous activity in one or two sessions per week had lower risks for death from all causes, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer.

Although it may be easier to fit less frequent bouts of activity into a busy lifestyle, little has been known about the weekend warrior physical activity pattern.

Gary O’Donovan, Ph.D., of Loughborough University, England, and coauthors conducted a pooled analysis of 63,591 adults who responded to English and Scottish household-based surveys. Data were collected from 1994 to 2012. The authors looked at associations between the weekend warrior and other physical activity patterns and the risk for death from all causes, CVD and cancer.

The risk of death from all causes was about 30 percent lower among weekend warrior adults compared with inactive adults, while the risk of CVD death for weekend warriors was 40 percent lower and the risk of cancer death was 18 percent lower.

Comment: Wow.  Unexpected good news.

Effectiveness of PRP for OA of the Knee


Which works better for osteoarthritis of the knee?  Find out next…

Efficacy Of Platelet-Rich Plasma In The Treatment Of Knee Osteoarthritis: A Meta-Analysis Of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Dr. Jack Cush writing in Rheumnow reported on a large study evaluating the use of platelet rich plasma (PRP) vs other therapies. The analysis showed that at 6 months postinjection, PRP and hyaluronic acid (HA) had similar effects with respect to pain relief.   At 12 months postinjection, however, PRP was associated with significantly better pain relief than HA. The researchers also noted that PRP did not increase the risk of adverse events compared with HA and saline.

Current evidence indicates that, compared with HA, intra-articular PRP injection may have more benefit in pain relief and functional improvement in patients with symptomatic knee OA at 1 year postinjection.

Comment: PRP is definitely an effective treatment modality for OIA of the knee. It must be administered via US though for best results.

Chair Yoga For Osteoarthritis


I’m a fan of yoga and here’s a really interesting study

How Chair Yoga Could Become The Go-To Treatment For Arthritis Sufferers

Stephen Matthews writing for the Daily Mail reported chair yoga may help to reduce pain in older adults suffering from arthritis.

Researchers from Florida Atlantic University randomly assigned 131 older adults with osteoarthritis to either chair yoga or a health education program.

Participants went to their 45-minute session twice a week for around two months.

Pain measurements were taken before, during and after, in the study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

They found those in the chair yoga group showed a greater reduction in pain interference during their sessions.

This benefit lasted for around three months – four weeks after they had originally finished.
General pain, fatigue and gait also improved as a result of the chair yoga sessions.

Writing in the journal, the authors said: ‘Chair yoga should be further explored as a non-pharmacologic intervention for older people with osteoarthritis.’

Comment: Gentle with no side effects. Sounds good to me.

Wearable Fitness Trackers Don’t Help With Weight Loss


How much weight does wearing a fitness tracker help you lose?  Next

Wearable Activity Trackers Don’t Improve Weight Loss

Dr. Jack Cush writing in Rheum now reported that an article in JAMA has reported the results of a 24-month trial showing that obese individuals on a long-term healthy diet and exercise program do not have significantly more weight loss from using a wearable device that tracks their activity.

In a randomized clinical trial conducted at the University of Pittsburgh, 471 adult participants (with a BMI between 25-40) enrolled between 2010 and 2012. All subjects were placed on a low-calorie diet, prescribed increases in physical activity, and had group counseling sessions.

Patients randomized to the intervention group were given wearable device and accompanying web interface to monitor diet and physical activity – BodyMedia Fit Core, a wearable activity tracker worn on the upper arm. The Fit Core tracks steps, hours slept and calories burned and costs about $100.

After 24 months, people who used wearable activity trackers lost 2.4 kilograms (5.29 pounds) less than a group on a similar program but using a website to track their progress.

Both groups had improved their body composition, fitness, physical activity and diet, according to the report in JAMA.

The value and impact of wearable technology remains to be proven, especially with regard to weight loss.

Comment: Wow… maybe I should stop wearing this.

Mud Bath Therapy Knee Osteoarthritis


Mud… it’s not just for wrestling in anymore

Reported by the Academy of Integrative Pain Management this item…

Mud-Bath Therapy in Addition to Usual Care in Bilateral Knee Osteoarthritis: Economic Evaluation

An economic evaluation of mud-bath therapy was conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial. Patients (103) were randomly assigned to receive either a 2 weeks cycle of MBT in addition to their usual treatment or to continue routine care alone. The European Quality-of-Life Questionnaire-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire was administered at baseline, 2 weeks, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Direct healthcare resource consumption data up until 12 months were derived from a daily diary given to patients and returned at prescheduled follow-up visits. The results of this cost-effectiveness analysis support the use of the mud bath therapy as mid-term complementary therapy in the management of knee OA.

Page 1 of 3812345...102030...Last »

Search the Vlog