Browsing Tag: osteoarthritis knee

Nose Cartilage Helps Knee Osteoarthritis


Did you know your nose could help your knees.  Find out how next…

Aching Knee? Surgeons Pioneer Groundbreaking New Operation Taking Tissue From The NOSE To Grow Cartilage That May Be Due To Osteoarthritis!

Roger Dobson writing for the Daily Mail reported surgeons are taking tissue from the nose to grow cartilage to fix knee-joint pain.
The operation sees cartilage harvested from the nose, which is then used to grow patches of tissue to be transplanted on to knee joints.

The procedure is regarded as particularly beneficial for osteoarthritis patients, or those at risk of the joint disease, and doctors carrying out the operation say it could help thousands of people.

The most widely used procedure to repair the injury involves trimming any remaining damaged tissue and drilling holes in the bone beneath the defect to trigger bleeding and scar tissue that, it is hoped, can work as a substitute tissue.

But according to the NHS, results are variable, with studies suggesting that it offers only short-term benefits and does not lead to the formation of new cartilage.

Comment: The procedure is a bit risky for only short term relief but maybe it will improve.

For more information on regrowing cartilage for knee osteoarthritis, click this link:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7F59HYQhHjU

 

Gel Relieves Ostoearthritis

Wow… a new development that may help erase osteoarthritis… next

Unique Gel Combats Inflammation

Jessa Gamble writing for the Atlantic reported researchers have created a gel that can attach to inflammation sites and slowly deliver drugs to combat a wide variety of ailments—ulcerative colitis, arthritis and mucositis, to name a few. Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response, bringing extra blood to an injured area, but in cases of chronic inflammation, the heat, pain, and swelling become a problem. Developed at the Laboratory for Accelerated Medical Innovation at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, the hydrogel—a solid material with high water content—can carry a combination of drugs, and matches its drug release to the level of inflammation around it.

When the gel is injected into the joint of an arthritis patient, for example, it will only release its anti-inflammatory payload when the patient is experiencing a flare, a spike in pain and swelling. When it encounters healthy tissue, it stays intact and does not release its payload.

“There are lots of enzymes present in inflammation that can degrade the gel,” explains Jeff Karp, the principal investigator. That breakdown of the gel releases the drug it carries.

Comment: This looks promising… Stay tuned.

Pain Predictor of Knee Osteoarthritis


Are there early warning signs of knee arthritis? Yup!

Persistent knee pain predicts structural arthritis early.

Sara Freeman writing in Rheumatology news reported on a study that showed that persistent knee pain is in important predictor of structural joint damage and could potentially be used to predict knee osteoarthritis earlier according to Dutch research reported at the World Congress on Osteoarthritis. The analysis found that women participating in the Rotterdam study who had knee pain on most days of the preceding month were more than 4 times more likely to develop knee osteoarthritis within 5 years on MRI than were those without frequent knee pain.

Comment: a key finding.

Barefoot Running Fewer Musculoskeletal Injuries


Are you a runner… the next item is for you…

Running Barefoot May Protect Against Some Musculoskeletal Injuries

Dr. Lara Pullen writing in enews rheum reported on a study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. “We aren’t seeing more musculoskeletal injuries in barefoot runners,” explains Dr. Altman-Singles, one of the authors, in an interview. “If anything, we are seeing fewer of certain types of musculoskeletal injuries.”

The researchers examined the differences in injuries between habitually barefoot and habitually shod runners. They categorized participants as barefoot runners if individuals spent at least 50% of their running time barefoot. Barefoot runners were allowed to run in minimalist footwear for the balance of their running time. In many cases, barefoot runners had experienced injuries, such as fasciitis and iliotibial band syndrome, prior to switching to barefoot running.

The researchers also noted that plantar fasciitis was more common in the shod group than the barefoot group. Additionally, shod runners experienced more patellofemoral pain syndrome and ITBS than did barefoot runners. Dr. Altman-Singles describes this difference as huge. Although barefoot running may have offered some protection against plantar fasciitis, barefoot runners had a greater number of Achilles or calf and posterior tibialis strains when compared with shod runners.

Comment: If you want to try this, be careful.

Heart Attack After Total Knee Replacement


Disturbing risk of knee replacement… next

Heart Attack After Total Knee Replacement

Bruce Jancin writing in rheumatology News reported on a British study of more than 13,000 patients who underwent total knee replacement. A matched nonsurgical group was used as control. During the first month after knee replacement, there was an almost 9 fold increase in the risk of heart attack compared with the control group. At 3 months the risk was four times greater and at 6 months 2 times greater. Another finding was that the risk of venous thromboembolism- a blood clot that goes to the lungs- remained elevated for 5 years.

Comment: Wow… not good news for you if you want to have a knee replaced.

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