Browsing Tag: oa

Degenerative Meniscus Tears Rarely Require Surgery


And your surgeon says you need surgery… maybe not… next

Meniscal Tears May Not Need Surgery

Jack Cush reporting in RheumNow cited a study published in the British Medical Journal examines whether knee surgery or conservative medical management benefits those with degenerative meniscal tears. Patients with knee pain from a degenerative meniscal tear were randomized to either arthroscopic surgery (followed by daily exercises at home) or physical therapy (neuromuscular and strength exercises) two to three times a week for 12 weeks.

Over the next 2 years both groups improved. Muscle strength had improved more, on average, in the physical therapy group at the three-month checkup, but at the final two-year checkup, there was essentially no difference between the surgery and therapy groups, including in pain, ability to function in sports and recreation activities, and quality of life. The researchers noted that 19 percent of the therapy group opted to have surgery at some point but had achieved “no additional benefit” by the end of the study.

Conservative exercise therapy was equal to arthroscopic intervention overall, but also showed positive effects over surgery short-term muscle strength.  Clinicians should consider conservative management and physical therapy in middle-aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears.

Comment: Degenerative meniscus tears are secondary to the arthritis. Surgery is not generally warranted.

Americans More Obese


This next item falls into the , “Duh…. No kidding” category…

Americans heavier than they were two decades years ago, report says

Alexandra Sifferlin writing in Time reported the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics found that US men and women “weigh about 15 pounds more than they did 20 years ago.” According to the report, the average 5’9” man now weighs 195.7 pounds and the average 5’4” woman weighs 168.5 pounds. Time noted “men and women’s heights were about the same two decades ago.” The study also found that average 11-year-old boys and girls now weigh about 13 and 7 pounds more, respectively, in comparison to 1988-94. Boys have grown about an inch on average since then, while girls this age have remained the same height.

Comment: Overseas, Americans are referred to as the Porkus Americanus species.

Radiofrequency Neurotomy Efficient In Knee Osteoarthritis


Another promising treatment for osteoarthritis knee pain

Radiofrequency Neurotomy Efficient In Knee Osteoarthritis

Reported in Healthday, this item… For patients with chronic knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain, radiofrequency (RF) neurotomy of genicular nerves is safe and efficient, according to a study published in the International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases.

Sinem Sari, M.D., from Adnan Menderes University in Aydin, Turkey, and colleagues compared the efficacy of intra-articular injection of anesthetic and steroid and RF neurotomy of genicular nerves in 73 patients with chronic knee OA pain. Patients were randomized to the injection group or to the RF neurotomy group.

The researchers observed no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of pain. “This study demonstrated that genicular nerve RF neurotomy is a safe and efficient treatment modality and provides functional improvement along with an analgesia in patients with chronic knee OA,” the author said.

Comment: Interesting study.

Spironlactone for Knee Effusion


An old drug with a new use… next

Low-dose spironolactone seen as safe, effective treatment for patients with OA-related knee effusion

Reported in Healio… “Low dose spironolactone is a safe, effective and noninvasive treatment for osteoarthritis-related effusion. It is effective in mild and moderate cases and, to a lesser extent, in severe cases,” Sarah Ohrndorf, MD, specialist in internal medicine/rheumatology in the Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology at Charité University Hospital in Berlin.

Researchers categorized 200 patients with unilateral knee effusion related to osteoarthritis (OA) into four groups with 50 patients in group 1 receiving spironolactone for 2 weeks, 50 patients in group 2 receiving ibuprofen for 2 weeks, 50 patients in group 3 using cold compresses twice daily for 2 weeks and 50 patients in group 4 receiving placebo for 2 weeks.  Group 1 outperformed all other groups.

Comment: Who would have thunk it?

Nose Cartilage Helps Knee Osteoarthritis


Did you know your nose could help your knees.  Find out how next…

Aching Knee? Surgeons Pioneer Groundbreaking New Operation Taking Tissue From The NOSE To Grow Cartilage That May Be Due To Osteoarthritis!

Roger Dobson writing for the Daily Mail reported surgeons are taking tissue from the nose to grow cartilage to fix knee-joint pain.
The operation sees cartilage harvested from the nose, which is then used to grow patches of tissue to be transplanted on to knee joints.

The procedure is regarded as particularly beneficial for osteoarthritis patients, or those at risk of the joint disease, and doctors carrying out the operation say it could help thousands of people.

The most widely used procedure to repair the injury involves trimming any remaining damaged tissue and drilling holes in the bone beneath the defect to trigger bleeding and scar tissue that, it is hoped, can work as a substitute tissue.

But according to the NHS, results are variable, with studies suggesting that it offers only short-term benefits and does not lead to the formation of new cartilage.

Comment: The procedure is a bit risky for only short term relief but maybe it will improve.

For more information on regrowing cartilage for knee osteoarthritis, click this link:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7F59HYQhHjU

 

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