Browsing Tag: Complementary Therapy

Fish Oil Prevents Asthma


A surprising benefit of fish oil… next

Fish Oil Use During Pregnancy Linked To Lower Asthma Risk In Kids

Denise Grady writing for the New York Times reported that research indicated “women who took fish oil during the last three months of pregnancy significantly” reduced the likelihood “that their children would develop asthma.” The findings were published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Comment: dietary fish oil has multiple benefits and this is another one.

Wearable Fitness Trackers Don’t Help With Weight Loss


How much weight does wearing a fitness tracker help you lose?  Next

Wearable Activity Trackers Don’t Improve Weight Loss

Dr. Jack Cush writing in Rheum now reported that an article in JAMA has reported the results of a 24-month trial showing that obese individuals on a long-term healthy diet and exercise program do not have significantly more weight loss from using a wearable device that tracks their activity.

In a randomized clinical trial conducted at the University of Pittsburgh, 471 adult participants (with a BMI between 25-40) enrolled between 2010 and 2012. All subjects were placed on a low-calorie diet, prescribed increases in physical activity, and had group counseling sessions.

Patients randomized to the intervention group were given wearable device and accompanying web interface to monitor diet and physical activity – BodyMedia Fit Core, a wearable activity tracker worn on the upper arm. The Fit Core tracks steps, hours slept and calories burned and costs about $100.

After 24 months, people who used wearable activity trackers lost 2.4 kilograms (5.29 pounds) less than a group on a similar program but using a website to track their progress.

Both groups had improved their body composition, fitness, physical activity and diet, according to the report in JAMA.

The value and impact of wearable technology remains to be proven, especially with regard to weight loss.

Comment: Wow… maybe I should stop wearing this.

Mud Bath Therapy Knee Osteoarthritis


Mud… it’s not just for wrestling in anymore

Reported by the Academy of Integrative Pain Management this item…

Mud-Bath Therapy in Addition to Usual Care in Bilateral Knee Osteoarthritis: Economic Evaluation

An economic evaluation of mud-bath therapy was conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial. Patients (103) were randomly assigned to receive either a 2 weeks cycle of MBT in addition to their usual treatment or to continue routine care alone. The European Quality-of-Life Questionnaire-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire was administered at baseline, 2 weeks, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Direct healthcare resource consumption data up until 12 months were derived from a daily diary given to patients and returned at prescheduled follow-up visits. The results of this cost-effectiveness analysis support the use of the mud bath therapy as mid-term complementary therapy in the management of knee OA.

Glass of Red Wine Equals Hour at Gym


Want to hit the gym now. Wait… maybe there’s an alternative… next

A new study says a glass of red wine is the equivalent to an hour at the gym.

Research conducted by the University of Alberta, Canada has found that health benefits in resveratrol, a compound found in red wine, are similar to those we get from exercise.

Resveratrol was seen to improve physical performance, heart function and muscle strength in the same way as they’re improved after a gym session.

According to lead researcher, Jerry Behrens, these findings will particularly help those who are unable to exercise. Discussion over the health benefits of red wine have been well documented. Studies have revealed that those who drink a glass of red wine a day are less likely to develop dementia or cancer, that it’s good for your heart, anti-ageing and can regulate blood sugar.

Comment: And you sweat a lot less too.

Anti-Cytokines For Depression


A novel treatment for depression… next

Anti-cytokines reduce depression symptoms in clinical trials

Honor Whiteman writing in MNT reported researchers conducted a meta-analysis of 20 clinical trials that assessed the effects of anti-cytokine monoclonal antibodies and cytokine inhibitors in more than 5,000 patients with autoimmune diseases. These are biologic drugs commonly used to treat diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

On investigating the additional benefits of the anti-cytokine medications in each trial – seven of which were randomized controlled trials involving a placebo – the team found that the drugs led to a significant reduction in symptoms of depression among participants, regardless of whether they were effective against autoimmune diseases.

While further studies are required, the researchers say their results suggest anti-cytokine medications may be a feasible treatment option for patients with depression – particularly for those who do not respond to current antidepressants.

“About a third of patients who are resistant to antidepressants show evidence of inflammation,” notes Dr. Golam Khandaker, of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. “So, anti-inflammatory treatments could be relevant for a large number of people who suffer from depression.”

Comment: Another set of drugs crosses over to a new discipline.

 

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