Browsing Tag: arthritis

Patients Don’t Store Biologics Properly


A word of caution to patients who take biologics

Most Patients Do Not Store Their Biologic Drugs Within the Recommended Temperature Range

Dr. Kevin Deane writing in Medscape reported on a Dutch study which evaluated the temperatures at which patients with rheumatic diseases stored their biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). They did this by providing patients with an electronic temperature logger.

Of the 293 study participants given a temperature logger, 255 (87.0%) returned their logger to the pharmacy. Of these 255 participants, only 17 (6.7%) had stored their medication within the recommended temperature range. Of those who did not, 24.3% stored their medication for more than 2 hours outside of the recommended range.

The authors did not evaluate the effect of these storage conditions on the biologic activity of the medication but speculated that storing these medications outside of the recommended temperature range may adversely affect their efficacy.

Comment: It’s important to know what the temperature restrictions are for your medication.

FDA Nixes Antacids With Aspirin


An over the counter preparation that could be life-threatening… next

FDA warns OTC antacids with aspirin can cause stomach or intestinal bleeding

Lydia Wheeler writing in The Hill reported that the Food and Drug Administration “is warning consumers to beware of over-the-counter drugs that contain both an antacid and aspirin.” According to the agency, these products “can cause stomach or intestinal bleeding.” Although rare, the FDA says it has identified eight cases of serious bleeding since 2009.

Comment: Not a big surprise here. In the old days when we used high doses of aspirin, people would get bleeding ulcers frequently.

 

Barefoot Running Fewer Musculoskeletal Injuries


Are you a runner… the next item is for you…

Running Barefoot May Protect Against Some Musculoskeletal Injuries

Dr. Lara Pullen writing in enews rheum reported on a study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. “We aren’t seeing more musculoskeletal injuries in barefoot runners,” explains Dr. Altman-Singles, one of the authors, in an interview. “If anything, we are seeing fewer of certain types of musculoskeletal injuries.”

The researchers examined the differences in injuries between habitually barefoot and habitually shod runners. They categorized participants as barefoot runners if individuals spent at least 50% of their running time barefoot. Barefoot runners were allowed to run in minimalist footwear for the balance of their running time. In many cases, barefoot runners had experienced injuries, such as fasciitis and iliotibial band syndrome, prior to switching to barefoot running.

The researchers also noted that plantar fasciitis was more common in the shod group than the barefoot group. Additionally, shod runners experienced more patellofemoral pain syndrome and ITBS than did barefoot runners. Dr. Altman-Singles describes this difference as huge. Although barefoot running may have offered some protection against plantar fasciitis, barefoot runners had a greater number of Achilles or calf and posterior tibialis strains when compared with shod runners.

Comment: If you want to try this, be careful.

Computer Vision Syndrome


Got blurred vision after spending time at the computer?   You’re not alone

“Computer vision syndrome” could affect millions, report suggests

Jane Brody writing for The New York Times reported that up to 70 million workers worldwide are at risk for “computer vision syndrome,” according to a report published in Medical Practice and Reviews.

Researchers found that workers who spend three or more hours per day looking at computer monitors are most at risk for the condition, and that many of those workers complain of “blurred or double vision as well as burning, itching, dryness and redness.”

Comment: Hope this is informative

T’ai chi as effective as PT for Knee OA


Now that we know acetaminophen doesn’t work for osteoarthritis, is there something else that might. There is and the answer will surprise you… next

Tai Chi May Be as Good as PT for Knee Arthritis Pain

Janis Kelly writing for Medscape reported the first randomized head-to-head comparison of tai chi and conventional physical therapy (PT) in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) shows equally good pain relief with either intervention, researchers report in an article published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The researchers also show that tai chi was more effective than PT at relieving depression and improving the physical component of quality of life.

Comment: No side effects either. Nice.

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