Browsing Tag: Arthritis Medications

Diabetes Causing More Deaths


The number 3 killer and rising

Diabetes May Be Responsible For More US Deaths Than Previously Believed

Arlene Karidis writing for the Washington Post reported, “Nearly four times as many Americans may die of diabetes as indicated on death certificates, a rate that would bump the disease up from the seventh-leading cause of death to No. 3, according to estimates in a study” published in PLOS One. The study’s lead author said, “We argue diabetes is responsible for 12 percent of deaths in the US, rather than 3.3 percent that death certificates indicate.” The Post added that last year, “diabetes accounted for about $1.04 billion in National Institutes of Health funding, compared with about $5.65 billion spent on cancer research.”

Comment: And I expect it will become even more of a problem in the future.

Cancer Rates Decreasing In US


Good news on the cancer front… next

Cancer Mortality Rates Decreasing In The US

Cristina Silva reporting for Newsweek stated that the National Institutes of Health’s Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer indicated “death rates for the most common types of cancer dropped for men, women and children from all racial and ethnic backgrounds from 2010-2014.” Investigators found that “the rates of new cancers were lower for men but held steady for women.”

Comment: As newer therapies are developed, we are slowly beating back this old enemy.

Pregabalin No Better Than Placebo For Sciatic


A commonly used drug for sciatica… does it really work? Next

Pregabalin May Be No Better Than Placebo For Relieving The Leg Pain Associated With Sciatica, Study Suggests

Jia Naqvi writing in the Washington Post reported  that research suggests pregabalin, which is “frequently prescribed for pain, is no more effective than a placebo at controlling sciatica.” The researchers at the George Institute for Global Health in Australia followed 209 sciatica patients in Sydney who were randomly assigned to receive either the drug pregabalin, more commonly known as Lyrica, or a placebo. The results showed no significant differences in leg pain intensity between the group on the placebo and that on Lyrica after eight weeks taking the drug or during the rest of the year on follow-up exams. Similarly, there were no differences for other outcomes such as back pain, quality of life and degree of disability.The findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Comment: Surprising results

Beta Blockers Help With Pain


A heart medicine for pain?  Next

Beta blocker use associated with less joint pain and opioid use in osteoarthritis

Ajai Raj writing in Pain Medicine News reported on a study published in Arthritis Care and Research.  A University of Nottingham trial looked at 873 patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. From their prospective observational study they concluded that beta blockers, drugs used commonly for patients with cardiac disease and hypertension helped reduce arthritis related pain. In addition the use of opioids was also reduced. They proposed a randomized trial would better assess these findings.

Comment: Promising I believe.

Brushing and Flossing Prevents RA


One simple task you can do to prevent rheumatoid arthritis

Brush And Floss To Prevent Rheumatoid Arthritis

Ruth Kava writing for the American council on Science and  Health reported recent research published in Science Translational Medicine suggests how good dental care might well be an important factor in preventing the onset of RA.

The investigators, led by Dr. Maximilian Koenig from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, explained that a bacterium associated with periodontal disease — Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) — could be the initiator of the autoimmune feature of RA. The investigators noted that Aa, of all the other identified microbes, was the only one known that could produce the spectrum of antigens found in the joints of individuals with RA.

To investigate this possibility, they collected fluid from the gum regions of people with periodontal disease and from those of controls and analyzed them for the presence of altered proteins which are known to be immune system targets.  In sum, people with periodontitis are more likely to have the Aa bacterial toxin and thus more likely to produce targets for the immune system. This in turn, links periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis.

Comment: An interesting finding that confirms the research of others.

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