Browsing Tag: Arthritis Medications

Zinc Lozenges Shorten Duration of Common Cold

https://youtu.be/GAfj1Zqdgmg
Some good news

Zinc Lozenges May Triple Rate Of Recovery From Common Cold, Meta-Analysis Suggests

Amanda Macmillan reporting for TIME stated, “Zinc lozenges may triple the rate of recovery from the common cold, according to a new meta-analysis of three studies” published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases. There is a “caveat,” however. Researchers “looked at doses much higher than are commonly recommended by doctors, and the authors say that not all zinc lozenges on the market are effective.”

Comment: I use these all the time when I feel a cold coming on.

Steroid Injections May Be No Better Than Placebo For Pain Linked To Knee Osteoarthritis

Steroid Injections May Be No Better Than Placebo For Pain Linked To Knee Osteoarthritis, Study Suggests

Nicholas Bakalar writing for the New York Times reported that while physicians “often prescribe steroid injections for the pain of knee arthritis,” research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association “has found they work no better than a placebo.”

Randy Dotinga writing for Healthday added that investigators found that individuals with knee osteoarthritis who received “steroid injections every three months for two years had no less pain than those taking a placebo treatment.” Additionally, researchers found that “they had greater loss of cartilage.”

Comment: What a bunch of horse doo-doo. These injections do work and this study is an example of stupidity.

Noisy Knees Early Sign of Osteoarthritis


An early sign of osteoarthritis in the knees… next

Noisy Knees Could Signal Onset Osteoarthritis Research Finds.

Diane King writing in the Edinburgh News reported noisy knees may be an early sign of osteoarthritis, new research suggests. People who hear grating, cracking or popping sounds in and around their knee joints are more likely to develop the condition, say scientists. Researchers conducted a multi-centre observational study that included almost 3,500 participants at high risk of knee osteoarthritis. The chances of them developing pain symptoms over a period of up to four years increased with greater frequency of knee noise. It doubled when the noises were heard “often” and trebled for patients who said they “always” experienced them. The findings, published in the journal Arthritis Care & Research, may lead to new ways of diagnosing and treating osteoarthritis earlier, said the researchers. US lead author Dr Grace Lo, from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, said: “Many people who have signs of osteoarthritis on X-rays do not necessarily complain of pain, and there are no known strategies for preventing the development of pain in this group of people. “This study suggests that if these people have noisy knees, they are at higher risk for developing pain within the next year compared with the people who do not have noisy knees.

Comment: Noisy knees are pretty common and so is osteoarthritis of the knees.

Bystander CPR Prevents Brain Damage in Cardiac Arrest


Bystander CPR… very important… next

Bystander CPR, Defibrillation May Reduce Long-Term Likelihood Of Brain Damage, Death In Cardiac Arrest Patients, Study Suggests

Gene Emery writing for Reuters reported that research suggests that “when a bystander gives CPR or applies an automatic defibrillator to someone who has collapsed from cardiac arrest, the benefits persist for at least a year.” The study “concluded that the two techniques lower the long-term risk of death from any cause, brain damage or nursing home admission by one third in people who are still alive 30 days after their cardiac arrest.” The findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Comment: You should learn basic CPR. It might save the life of a loved one.

Early Treatment Means Better Prognosis In Rheumatoid Arthritis


Here’s the proof about treating arthritis early

Early Treatment Equals Better Results for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Alan Mozes writing for Healthday reported treating rheumatoid arthritis early may make for better outcomes, a new study suggests.

Patients who were treated within six months of developing the first signs of the autoimmune disease did better in the long run and were less likely to suffer early death, British researchers found.

The findings stem from an analysis of more than 600 patients who were initially diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) between 1990 and 1994. They were tracked for over 20 years.

Over the study time frame, investigators assessed key symptoms of RA, such as swollen and/or tender joints, and indications of disability. All deaths were also noted.
The research team found that patients who started treatment for RA within the first half-year after the first symptoms surfaced tended to have no greater levels of disability over a 20-year period than patients who required no treatment.

Comment: It is critical to be aggressive with this disease.

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