Vagus Nerve Stimulation Helps Rheumatoid Arthritis


Here’s an interesting twist on rheumatoid arthritis treatment… next

Nerve Stimulation ‘Eases Symptoms’ Of Chronic Condition Rheumatoid Arthritis

Olivia Lerche writing in the Express reported scientists believe stimulating the vagus nerve, which controls electrical signals to the stomach, heart and lungs, can significantly reduce pain and swelling caused by chronic joint inflammation.

The nerve can be stimulated with an electrical device surgically implanted into the body to send pulses through the vagus at various intervals.

Clinical trial data published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) revealed stimulating the vagus nerve with a bioelectronic device significantly improved the level of disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Comment: Wow. This is unreal … I really am excited about this one.


A common activity that may stunt your growth… next

TV Watching Stunts Bone Growth, Study Finds

Megan Daily writing in MD reported long periods of television watching could have the same negative effects on kids’ bone growth as total bed rest, an Australian study found.

Australian research presented in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research shows decreased bone mass in young adults who spent more of their childhood hours in front of a television set.

Of more than1,000 young men and women scanned at age 20 those who had watched 14 or more hours of TV each week as children and adolescents had less bone mineral content than their peers.

Comment: Wow… that’s pretty alarming.

 


Is there an effective treatment for c diff.?  Found out next.

Fecal Transplants Effective Against C. Difficile Infections, Study Finds

Carl Zimmer writing in the New York Times  reported that fecal transplants appear to be “remarkably effective” against “potentially fatal infections of bacteria known as Clostridium difficile.” In a study, investigators “isolated the spores of about 50 different species of bacteria found in stool samples donated by healthy people.” Next, researchers put “the spores” into capsules, “which they gave to 30 patients with C. difficile infections.” Notably, 29 of those 30 patients recovered. While no one knows for sure how fecal transplants work, experts theorize that bacteria from a healthy donor’s GI tract may “be able to gobble up nutrients that compete with invaders like C. difficile which are needed to survive.” The findings were published July 15 in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Comment: C diff is an awful disease to have and is responsible for many deaths, particularly among older individuals.  This is welcome news.


Is there an effective treatment for c diff.? Found out next.

Fecal Transplants Effective Against C. Difficile Infections

Study finds Carl Zimmer writing in the New York Times reported that fecal transplants appear to be “remarkably effective” against “potentially fatal infections of bacteria known as Clostridium difficile.” In a study, investigators “isolated the spores of about 50 different species of bacteria found in stool samples donated by healthy people.” Next, researchers put “the spores” into capsules, “which they gave to 30 patients with C. difficile infections.” Notably, 29 of those 30 patients recovered. While no one knows for sure how fecal transplants work, experts theorize that bacteria from a healthy donor’s GI tract may “be able to gobble up nutrients that competing invaders like C. difficile need to survive.” The findings were published July 15 in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Comment: C diff is an awful disease to have and is responsible for many deaths, particularly among older individuals. This is welcome news.

 


Did you know your nose could help your knees.  Find out how next…

Aching Knee? Surgeons Pioneer Groundbreaking New Operation Taking Tissue From The NOSE To Grow Cartilage That May Be Due To Osteoarthritis!

Roger Dobson writing for the Daily Mail reported surgeons are taking tissue from the nose to grow cartilage to fix knee-joint pain.
The operation sees cartilage harvested from the nose, which is then used to grow patches of tissue to be transplanted on to knee joints.

The procedure is regarded as particularly beneficial for osteoarthritis patients, or those at risk of the joint disease, and doctors carrying out the operation say it could help thousands of people.

The most widely used procedure to repair the injury involves trimming any remaining damaged tissue and drilling holes in the bone beneath the defect to trigger bleeding and scar tissue that, it is hoped, can work as a substitute tissue.

But according to the NHS, results are variable, with studies suggesting that it offers only short-term benefits and does not lead to the formation of new cartilage.

Comment: The procedure is a bit risky for only short term relief but maybe it will improve.

For more information on regrowing cartilage for knee osteoarthritis, click this link:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7F59HYQhHjU

 

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