Basil Arthritis


Another herb that might work…

Arthritis: Holy Basil Treatment for Pain

Breana Noble writing in Newsmax reported holy basil may be able to help with the joint pain.

A treatment from the Indian Ayurvedic tradition, holy basil (Ocimum basilicum) – also known as tulsi, meaning “The Incomparable One” – is one of the most sacred herbs in the tradition.

An adaptogen, it helps the body to work at its prime level even while under large amounts of stress by regulating the creation of stress hormones including cortisol and adrenaline, the magazine explained.

It contains high amounts of anti-inflammatory elements and antioxidants, helpful in fighting joint pain, Natural News reported.

Comment: Holy Basil Batman!

It takes balls to treat osteoarthritis… next

Tiny gel balls ease pain of arthritis

 

Roger Dobson writing for the Daily Mail reported bombarding blood vessels with tiny gel balls could help ease painful arthritic joints.

Abnormal blood vessels can form around injured joints. These, in turn, are thought to cause the chronic pain linked to osteoarthritis, stiff shoulders and tendon injuries.

Now scientists have discovered a treatment where blocking the abnormal vessels dramatically reduces pain in patients with these conditions.

The new therapy, known as transcatheter arterial embolisation, is based on the theory that the pain is linked to new blood vessels forming around the joint as part of the body’s natural repair process, rather than the cartilage damage itself.

Sometimes in inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, this process gets out of control, causing blood vessels to grow where they’re not needed.

Tiny spheres, which are a thousandth of an inch in diameter and made of a special gel, are inserted using a thin tube fed through the main artery in the groin to the problem area, such as the knee.

Once in place, these microspheres are released, blocking the blood supply to the neighboring nerves, which reduces pain signals. As the blood vessels and nerves die, they and the microspheres are absorbed by the body.

Animal studies have shown the treatment reduces inflammation and pain.

 

Comment: With all due respects to the National Football League, I term this treatment “inflategate.”

 

What the surgical establishment doesn’t want you to know about minimally invasive carpal tunnel release!

Thread carpal tunnel release is as effective as open surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome and surgery can mean weeks of recovery and physical therapy. Why is that? It’s because carpal tunnel surgery hasn’t changed in more than 30 years. Sure, endoscopic release – using a telescope- has been employed but the fact of the matter is that only a few surgeons in the entire world are skilled enough to accomplish this without any side effects and complications.

The numbers speak for themselves when it comes to outcomes with carpal tunnel surgery. So… here’s the question…

Do you want to be a statistic?

The search has been to find ways to treat this condition without subjecting the patient to surgery and the attendant risks of general anesthesia.

A recent technological advance has arrived. It has been shown in carefully performed cadaver studies to provide the exact release of the transverse carpal ligament as open surgery but without many of the potential complications.

The Guo thread carpal tunnel release uses a metal impregnated thread and ultrasound guidance to create a gentle, precise cut. Local anesthetic only is used. Recovery time is shortened and potential complications, while they can occur as with any invasive procedure, are minimized.

So you might be asking… is this technique 100 % effective. And the answer is quite simply no. Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome have problems at various stages. Some early and some late. Late patients regardless of what procedure they have do not do as well as patients who are seen earlier. However, those patients seen at the same point in time do better with miniamlly invasive thread carpal tunnel release than those patients who undergo either endoscope or open procedures.

And, for no apparent reason, some people may not get back to 100%. That being said, thread carpal tunnel release is safer than and just as effective as open carpal tunnel surgery.

To find out more, go to www.arthritistreatmentcenter.com… That’s www.arthritistreatmentcenter.com.

Is there something other than a pill or shot that will definitely help with arthritis…? Next

 

Study Says Yoga Can Ease Arthritis, Boost Mood

 

Diane Depra writing for Tech times reported a study has found that yoga is safe and effective as a means of staying active for those with arthritis, given certain adjustments are incorporated into a routine to address individual limitations.

 

A randomized trial has found that yoga is safe and effective for people with rheumatoid arthritis and knee osteoarthritis, two common forms of arthritis.

 

In a study published in The Journal of Rheumatology, researchers report that yoga classes taken for eight weeks have improved not just the physical but the mental well-being as well of people with rheumatoid arthritis and knee osteoarthritis. This isn’t the first time that researchers have explored the benefits of yoga but the study is the biggest randomized trial so far to tackle yoga’s effects on physical and psychological health.

 

Susan Bartlett, one of the authors of the study, said that there is a growing interest in yoga as a form of complementary treatment, with one out of every 10 people in the United States now engaged in the activity to improve their health and fitness. Yoga works for those with arthritis because it brings together physical activity and relaxation and stress management techniques while acknowledging varying limitations.

 

Comment: I have taken yoga for more than 2 years at my wife’s urging. It helps with stretching, balance, strength, and breathing all of which are important for patients with arthritis.


Is there something other than a pill or shot that will definitely help with arthritis…? Next

Study Says Yoga Can Ease Arthritis, Boost Mood

 

Diane Depra writing for Tech times reported a study has found that yoga is safe and effective as a means of staying active for those with arthritis, given certain adjustments are incorporated into a routine to address individual limitations.

 

A randomized trial has found that yoga is safe and effective for people with rheumatoid arthritis and knee osteoarthritis, two common forms of arthritis.

 

In a study published in The Journal of Rheumatology, researchers report that yoga classes taken for eight weeks have improved not just the physical but the mental well-being as well of people with rheumatoid arthritis and knee osteoarthritis. This isn’t the first time that researchers have explored the benefits of yoga but the study is the biggest randomized trial so far to tackle yoga’s effects on physical and psychological health.

 

Susan Bartlett, one of the authors of the study, said that there is a growing interest in yoga as a form of complementary treatment, with one out of every 10 people in the United States now engaged in the activity to improve their health and fitness. Yoga works for those with arthritis because it brings together physical activity and relaxation and stress management techniques while acknowledging varying limitations.

 

Comment: I have taken yoga for more than 2 years at my wife’s urging. It helps with stretching, balance, strength, and breathing all of which are important for patients with arthritis.

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