UVB Exposure May Reduce Risk Of RA In Women.

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UVB Exposure May Reduce Risk Of RA In Women.

Nancy Walsh writing in MedPage Today reported that “more intense sunlight exposure was linked with a decreased incidence of rheumatoid arthritis among women in the original Nurses’ Health Study,” though “the more common use of sunscreen likely attenuated the association in a later cohort.” In support of this conclusion, other “epidemiologic studies have found a correlation between an increased incidence of RA and other autoimmune diseases with higher latitude of residence.” UVB has also been shown to have immunosuppressive effects, as well as increasing vitamin D synthesis.

Comment:  Good news for sun worshippers but be careful.  We all know the risks of too much sunlight!

 

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Are Squats Good For Older Knees?

Gretchen Reynolds writing in the New York Times reported in its “Ask Well” blog that “An easy exercise to target those muscles” in your knees “is the squat,” which “is actually ‘quite good for the knees, if you do the squats correctly,'” according to Dr. Joseph Hart, assistant professor of kinesiology and certified athletic trainer at the University of Virginia. The Times adds, however, that “before starting any exercise program, consult a physician, especially…if your knees often ache, feel stiff or emit a strange, clicking noise, which could be symptoms of arthritis.”

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Car Commuting Linked To Weight Gain

Kathryn Doyle writing in Reuters reported a study from Australia that found car commuters gain an average of four pounds over four years compared to those who commute to work by another medium or worked from home. Lead author Takemi Sugiyama of the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne explained that even participants in the study who were moderately active still saw weight gain. Only those in the study who both did not drive to work and received enough weekly exercise did not gain weight over the course of the study.

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Gap Between People’s Estimated And Their Actual Weight

Monte Morin writing in the LA Times reported on a study published in the journal PLoS ONE that found that “men and women, particularly those categorized as obese, have grown increasingly likely over the years to underestimate their true weight.” Researchers at University College of Cork “examined height and weight data for Irish adults over a nine-year period. In three separate health surveys, men and women were asked to estimate their height and weight, and those figures were used to calculate body mass index.” The researchers found that when the participants’ responses were measured for accuracy, their weight estimates grew “increasingly inaccurate over time.” In a 1998 survey, the rate of accuracy was 80%. It dropped to 64% in 2002 and 53% in 2009.

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Know about aspirin resistance?

Well, there’s a condition referred to as “aspirin resistance”.  Many people who take aspirin for prophylaxis against heart attack and stroke have been found to not respond.

Elizabeth Mechatie writing in Rheumatology News reported on a study showing that aspirin resistance is
actually not resistance at all.  It is due to the enteric coating that many aspirin preparations have.  This phenomenon is called “pseudoresistance.”  When patients who were initially thought to be resistant were switched from enteric coated tablets to plain aspirin, the resistance disappeared.

 

 

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