Cherries Reduce Risk Of Gout Attacks.

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Cherries Reduce Risk Of Gout Attacks.

Jennifer LaRue Huget writing in the Washington Post reported that cherries may help reduce risk of gout attacks, according to “a study published in Arthritis & Rheumatism.  Investigators followed
more than 630 patients with gout suffers for one year. Participants provided information about their gout attacks. The researchers found that participants “who reported eating a ½-cup serving of cherries a day (about 10 or 12 cherries) were 35 percent less likely to have a subsequent attack than those who did not eat cherries.” This was also seen in participants who had eaten cherry extract. The investigators reported that “the risk of gout attack decreased as cherry consumption (fruit or extract) increased, though that only held true for consumption of up to three servings over two days.”

Once a folk remedy, this now has some scientific cred behind it.

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RA Drugs Hold Promise for MS

Greg Williams writing in the UAB News reported that UAB researchers feel that a new class of drugs for rheumatoid arthritis may be useful for treating multiple sclerosis. The findings are timely because STATs are part of the JAK-STAT pathway targeted by a new class of JAK inhibitors, the first of which are expected to finish clinical trials for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and seek regulatory approval this year. Such drugs should be considered for the treatment of MS, say the authors, who already are conducting pre-clinical studies. STAT3-signaling is known to activate microglia and onocytes, the immune cells of the brain and macrophage scavengers that collect and dispose of damaged tissue or invading bacteria.

They can promote either injury or repair in the central nervous system, depending on the signals they get.

Comment: You’ll be hearing a lot about this RA treatment in the coming months.

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Radiation Therapy Provides Relief For Plantar Fasciitis

Helen Albert writing in Medwire reported on a study of  62 patients, published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, which showed that “external beam radiation therapy, similar to that used in treating cancer, provided effective pain relief for patients with plantar fasciitis.” For the study, “researchers found that 80% of those who received standard-dose therapy experienced complete pain relief, 64% of whom maintained this relief for up to 48 weeks.”

I would be concerned that radiation would bring along its own potential risks.  There are better and safer options for this condition. It’s like using a bazooka to kill a mouse.

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Fitness May Not Prevent Injuries In College Athletes

Nicholas Bakalar writing in the New York Times reported on a recent study of 86 college athletes published in the journal Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology, which found “there was no correlation between overall fitness and the time until a first injury.” The researchers “assumed preseason fitness would create greater resilience,” but it turned out “the best predictors of early injury were being female and playing volleyball.”

Wow.  This is surprising. I knew that women basketball players were at risk for ACL injuries.  This does make sense though

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Biologics For RA Don’t Increase Cancer Risk.

Charles Bankhead writing in Medpag Today reported on a study that showed “Treatment with biologic response modifiers did not predispose patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to an increased risk of cancer.  This was an analysis, of clinical trials involving almost 30,000 patients.” Investigators found that “patients treated with biologic agents, either alone or in combination with methotrexate, had cancer rates similar to the 0.66% observed among patients in the control groups.

Definitely, comforting news although I think we need to keep an eye on the situation.  What happens long term.  I have a son and sister who have been on biologic therapy and I do worry.

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