Most Americans Get Enough Vitamin D!

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Most Americans Get Enough Vitamin D

In contrast to a previous blog posting about Americans not getting enough vitamin D, Rob Stein writing in the Washington Post reported that the Institute of Medicine “released new recommendations for how much vitamin D people should be getting on a regular basis.”  He continues, “In spite of mounting pressure to urge many Americans to sharply boost their vitamin D levels, they did not advocate a huge increase.” In fact, “an expert committee concluded that most Americans and Canadians up to age 70 need no more than 600 international units of vitamin D per day.”  “The analysis showed that the risk for vitamin D deficiency differed by age, sex and race or ethnicity,” Robert Preidt added in HealthDay.  Basically… it’s all confusing and patient care needs to be given on a case-by-case method.

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A High Fish Diet May Increase Bone Strength?

Kerry Grens writing in Reuters reports that, according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, seniors who eat large amounts of fish may preserve their bone density better than seniors who eat less fish. For the study, researchers looked at surveys compiled in the 1980s and 1990s of the eating habits of over 600 seniors in Massachusetts.

They found that both men and women who ate three or more weekly servings of tuna, or dark fish such as salmon – which have high levels of omega 3 fats and omega 6 fatty acids — had lower bone density losses four years later compared to those who reported eating fish rarely. While men who consumed dark fish or tuna at least three times per week had less bone loss than other males.

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One Third Of Americans May Not Be Getting Enough Vitamin D.

Mary Brophy Marcus writing in USA Today reports, “About one third of Americans are not getting enough vitamin D,” according to a National Center for Health Statistics data brief by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  The report “parallels what many other studies have suggested in recent years: that a large chunk of the population is at risk for low vitamin D levels.” Although approximately “two-thirds had sufficient levels… about a third were in ranges suggesting risk of either inadequate or deficient levels, says report author Anne Looker, a research scientist with the CDC.”  Not enough vitamin D… Hmmm.  Maybe yes… maybe no.

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Study Suggests NSAIDs Raise Risk Of Miscarriage.

Diane Sawyer reporting for ABC said that “some over the counter painkillers are a risk to pregnant women, doubling the risk of miscarriage.” A Canadian study looked at 4,700 women that had a miscarriage, and they compared those to 47,000 who did not.  What they found was that the women who had miscarriages, in the first 20 weeks, were more than twice as likely to take painkillers called NSAIDs. Examples include Aleve, Motrin, Ibuprofen.”

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